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Congressman Andy Harris

Representing the First District of Maryland

Education

Every child should have access to a quality education, whether they are educated in a public school, private school, or at home. The best way to provide children with quality education is to have local governments determine the best curricula for their students, not through federal micromanagement. Education is not a “one size fits all” issue, and that has been the federal government’s approach for too long. Education serves to prepare our students for the 21st century job market – but the job market on the Eastern Shore is different from the job market in Baltimore City, and public schools should have the freedom to tailor their curricula to the specific and unique needs of their communities.

Unfortunately, despite huge investments, not every public school is equal. Children should not be subjected to a poor-quality education because of their home address, which is why I am a strong proponent of school choice. Charter schools in Maryland have empowered parents to seek out a better education for their children, and voucher programs would enable low-income families to enroll their students in private schools if the local public school system is failing them.

More on Education

May 24, 2017 Video

On May 24, 2017, the House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee held a hearing on the FY 2018 budget for the U.S. Department of Education. Subcommittee Chairman Tom Cole presides.

Witness: The Honorable Betsy DeVos, Secretary of Education

April 20, 2017 In The News

RIDGELY — U.S. Rep. Andy Harris, R-Md.-1, visited the Benedictine School on Tuesday, April 18, to learn more about the school and the vast range of services it offers to children and adults with developmental disabilities.

The stop was the first throughout the First Congressional District on his schedule this week, while Congress takes a recess.

Harris took a tour of part of the sprawling campus outside Ridgely, seeing classrooms, residential halls and the school’s graphic design business, and talked to administrators about the school’s future.